Process Cloud Service – Web Form Design Approaches by Antonis Antoniou

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Oracle Process Cloud Service uses a standards-based technology called "Web Forms" for defining the user interface in business processes. It’s based on standards such as XHTML, CSS and JavaScript and allows business analysts and developers to create an end-user interface by just using the browser.
There are three approaches that can be employed when designing web forms:
Form-First: You can follow a "Form-First" approach where you create the form first before any data elements are defined and you let PCS by just drag and dropping components from the component palette to the page. Oracle PCS will automatically generate the schema that defines the data required by the web form.

The schema that is automatically generated by Oracle PCS is based on the web form controls added to the web form and can be located under "Business Types" section.

When you assign the web form to a human task activity, the schema generated by Oracle PCS will automatically be used to define the human task data structure.
Data-First: A data-first approach implies a bottom-up approach where you create a web form based on data sources or business objects by just drag and dropping the objects on the form to create controls.

Oracle Process Cloud Service uses a standards-based technology called "Web Forms" for defining the user interface in business processes. It’s based on standards such as XHTML, CSS and JavaScript and allows business analysts and developers to create an end-user interface by just using the browser.
There are three approaches that can be employed when designing web forms:
Form-First: You can follow a "Form-First" approach where you create the form first before any data elements are defined and you let PCS by just drag and dropping components from the component palette to the page. Read the complete article here.

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BPM/SOA Human Task: Java code in jsp source files is not allowed in ojsp.next mode by Antonis Antoniou

clip_image002Today I came across an exception while trying to load one of my task details (v12.2.1).

Error: OracleJSP error: oracle.jsp.parse.JavaCodeException: Line # 14, oracle.jsp.parse.JspParseTagScriptlet@66e50889
Error: Java code in jsp source files is not allowed in ojsp.next mode

What was really strange to me was that I did not do anything different from what I used to do with previous versions.
After some research I found out that this was a known issue for 12.2.1. There are two possible causes for getting this error.
a) Either you are not using the fully qualified host name  (including domain name) for the forms to render properly. Read the complete article here.

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Correlations in Oracle BPM 12c by Antonis Antoniou

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Correlations in Oracle Business Process Management (BPM) is a special mechanism used to associate a message with a conversation between different partners in a business process.

There are two types of correlations:

  • Automatic: This is the default and out-of-the-box correlation used between two business partners which makes use of a special token called "Conversation Id" to uniquely associate a message with a conversation via Web Service Addressing (WS-Addressing) to correlate a callback message using the "Conversation Id".
  • Message Based: This type of correlation enables the definition and use of "business-friendly" information carried as part of the message payload to be used to uniquely identify and associate a message with a conversation (for example, OrderId, CustomerId, etc.). This type of correlation enables the definition of multiple attributes referred to as "Correlation Properties" into various correlation sets know as "Correlation Keys".

So let’s see how you to use the two correlation types in a demo scenario. The simulated process will invoke an asynchronous process first by using the default correlations and then by using message-based correlations.
Create the basic BPM application and BPM project (I named it OracleBPM12cCorrelationsDemoApp and OracleBPM12cCorrelationsDemo respectively) and choose "Composite with BPMN Process" in step 3 of the "Create BPM Application" and click “Finish”. Read the complete article here.

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BPM 12c Subprocesses (Part 3 of 3): Event Subprocess by Antonis Antoniou

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In this third and last part of a three part series on subprocesses we will explore a special type of subprocess referred to as an “Event” subprocess.
This type of subprocess is triggered by an event that can occur anytime during the execution of a process flow that allows you to interrupt the normal flow of an instance.
Such capability can be applicable in various use cases. For example, an error might occur in the process, or you can very well define various service level agreements to delineate execution times or you can even have a business requirement to cancel a flow (for example cancel an order).
You can use the “Event” subprocess to implement such requirements (i.e. handle system and business exceptions).
“Event” subprocesses posses various unique characteristics. One of them is that, by configuration, you can have an “Event” subprocess either as interrupting, that is interrupting the normal process flow execution or have an “Event” subprocess running in parallel (concurrently) to the main flow of your process.
Another really nice and useful characteristics of an “Event” subprocess is that it shares the same context as the main flow of the process, meaning that from the “Event” subprocess you can have access to all the data objects that are used by the main process (and of course update their state).
An “Event” subprocess resembles like an embedded subprocess (except that it’s displayed in a dashed-line boarder), however an “Event” subprocess cannot have outgoing or incoming sequence flows. And just as with the other types of subprocesses an “Event” subprocess can define data objects that are local to its scope.We will implement a very simple process that will make use of the event sub-process to simulate the functional use case depicted by the image above; the scenario is straightforward, you can cancel an order as long as it’s not shipped. Read the complete article here.

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ICS Integration Patterns (Part 1 of 3): Map My Data by Antonis Antoniou

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Oracle Integration Cloud Service (ICS) is another powerful yet simple Cloud platform offering by Oracle that simplifies the development of cloud and hybrid integrations (applications in the cloud and on premises).
The entire integration development and operational lifecycle is managed through a web based service console offering a point and click integration and monitoring experience without having to write a single line of code.
Furthermore Oracle ICS supports various industry standards like SOAP and REST and comes with a set of cloud adapters providing pre-integration capabilities with several SaaS applications (such as Oracle ERP Cloud, Oracle HCM Cloud, Oracle Sales Cloud, Oracle RightNow, Eloqua, NetSuite and Salesforce) shortening the time-to-market in integration projects.
The concepts in Oracle ICS are really simple; you create connections (using the pre-defined offered adapters) and leverage those connections to create integrations which you can then dashboard monitor to track the current state of your running integrations and fix any errors that might occur. Read the complete article here.

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BPM 12c Subprocesses (Part 3 of 3): Event Subprocess by Antonis Antoniou

clip_image001

In this third and last part of a three part series on subprocesses we will explore a special type of subprocess referred to as an “Event” subprocess.
This type of subprocess is triggered by an event that can occur anytime during the execution of a process flow that allows you to interrupt the normal flow of an instance.
Such capability can be applicable in various use cases. For example, an error might occur in the process, or you can very well define various service level agreements to delineate execution times or you can even have a business requirement to cancel a flow (for example cancel an order).
You can use the “Event” subprocess to implement such requirements (i.e. handle system and business exceptions).
“Event” subprocesses posses various unique characteristics. One of them is that, by configuration, you can have an “Event” subprocess either as interrupting, that is interrupting the normal process flow execution or have an “Event” subprocess running in parallel (concurrently) to the main flow of your process.
Another really nice and useful characteristics of an “Event” subprocess is that it shares the same context as the main flow of the process, meaning that from the “Event” subprocess you can have access to all the data objects that are used by the main process (and of course update their state).
An “Event” subprocess resembles like an embedded subprocess (except that it’s displayed in a dashed-line boarder), however an “Event” subprocess cannot have outgoing or incoming sequence flows. And just as with the other types of subprocesses an “Event” subprocess can define data objects that are local to its scope.We will implement a very simple process that will make use of the event sub-process to simulate the functional use case depicted by the image above; the scenario is straightforward, you can cancel an order as long as it’s not shipped. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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BPM 12c Subprocesses (Part 2 of 3): Embedded Subprocess by Antonis Antoniou

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In this second blog on sub-processes we will explore the embedded sub-processes, also referred to as inline sub-processes and as the name implies this is a sub-process type that consists of a series of activities (for example tasks, gateways, events, etc.) that resides within the parent process.

An embedded sub-process has certain distinct characteristics such as they always begin with a none start event and end with a non end event, they do not contain swimlanes and most importantly they share their parent’s context, meaning they can access parent process data which simplifies things since you are not required to define input and output parameters and pass them as data objects. If required you can defined data objects that are local to your embedded sub-process.
An embedded sub-process is mainly used to simplify the process model by grouping activities together into an embedded sub-process that can be collapsed or expanded to hide and show the implementation details.
Another common use of the embedded sub-process is to define loops which will be the case with the sample process that we will implement as part of this blog post.
We will be implementing a very simple process which will make use of the embedded sub-process to loop through a list of order items for review.
Create the basic BPM application and BPM project (i named it OracleBPM12cEmbeddedSubProcessDemoApp and OracleBPM12cEmbeddedSubProcessDemo respectively) and choose "Empty Composite" in step 3 of the "Create BPM Application" wizard since we will first create the the XSD schema file to describe our process’s input and output parameters. Read the complete article here.

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Running Business Processes in the Cloud by Antonis Antoniou

 

clip_image002My article on Oracle Process Cloud Service has just been published by OTech Magazine in its Fall 2015 "OpenWorld Special" edition. Oracle has been releasing a number of different cloud products, including Oracle Process Cloud Service (PCS) as an addition to its on-premise Oracle BPM Suite offering. This article briefly explains what PCS is about.
Read the complete article here

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Suppress Approval Controls from BPM Workspace 12c – Hidden Feature by Antonis Antoniou

 

clip_image002I recently came across a very interesting discussion on the Oracle BPM forum which stimulated my interest for investigation; how to suppress the human task custom outcomes from the action bar in the BPM Workspace application in 12c!
When you deploy a BPM process or a BPEL service that includes a human task component, the BPM Workspace will automatically include in its action bar the custom outcomes that you have defined on your human task.

In the image above it’s assumed that a composite has been deployed that includes a human task component that defines a custom outcome "Submit".
There are cases though that you might want to suppress this default behavior and not have your custom actions appearing in the actions list but just have them displayed in the task details.
In 11g this was "officially" supported with a checkbox option ("Show approval controls in task details only") in the advanced human task properties. Read the complete article here.

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Video: Error Handling and Recovery in Oracle BPM12c | Antonis Antoniou by Bob Rhubart

 

clip_image002Oracle ACE Associate and eProseed Technical Director Antonis Antoniou puts the pedal to the metal with this tip on two new developer-centric error handling and recovery features in Oracle BPM12c. Watch the video here.

Antonis’s tip is based on his OTN technical article series:

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