Additional new content PaaS Partner Community

image· Using Oracle API Cloud Services – Part 2 Oracle ACE Rolanda Carrasco Rolando shows you how to publish APIs to the API Portal, register an application and subscribe to an API, generate an API key, and more in part 2 of his series on the Oracle API Platform Cloud Service. Read the article.

· Podcast: Blockchain – Beyond Bitcoin Blockchain has emerged from under Bitcoin’s shadow to become a powerful trend in enterprise IT — and something that should be on every developer’s radar. This program assembles a panel of blockchain experts to discuss the technology’s impact, examine use cases, and offer suggestions for developers who want to learn more. Listen to the podcast.

· Coming to Your Town: Oracle Code 2018 The 2018 Oracle Code event series kicks off in Los Angeles on February 27, then makes its way to cities throughout the US and around the world. Sign up now to be notified when registration opens for your town, and learn how you can submit session proposals. Get more information

· Building Natural Interaction Using Chatbots Phil Gordon, CEO & founder of Chatbox.com, explains why chatbots are the “next big thing.”

· Happier Users and IT During the 1960s and ’70s, there was much debate on whether the US should be investing many billions of dollars in its space program versus more “pragmatic” concerns. One powerful argument for that investment was that the space program would yield a “dividend” of ancillary benefits to society that would far outweigh the direct investment. Consider just one example: the global GPS systems. The cloud dividend debate has taken a similar arc over the last decade—weighing the benefits that cloud users get beyond the service itself. In my latest Forbes column, I detail three of those dividends and propose that there’s now a fourth important one: put simply, using cloud services makes people happy.

· Digital Disruption Drill: Five Insights from Execs
At the recent Oracle Modern Supply Chain Experience conference, a range of business leaders offered advice to companies whose business processes, applications, and cultures are mired in a bygone era. Here are their best insights covering everything from leveling the tech playing field to creating a culture of change.

· Infographic: Ten Insights About Moving to Cloud

 

PaaS Partner Community

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Blockchain Simplifies International Money Transfers

imageAn emerging solution’s promise and potential for fintech By Vivek Alwayn

Anyone who has transferred money internationally between banks knows that the process often takes too long and costs too much. Now, with the advent of blockchain technology, transferring money should become simpler and faster for customers while also generating more revenue for the banks.

The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT), a global cooperative that provides secure financial messaging services, is currently working on a blockchain-based global payment initiative that will provide secure, end-to-end tracking for global financial transfers.

At this point, 30 banks are live on the blockchain platform, and SWIFT plans to eventually connect more than 11,000 licensed banks, financial institutions, and corporations across more than 200 countries. SWIFT says the platform will also enable future real-time regulatory compliance reporting to central banks and law enforcement agencies worldwide.

The SWIFT platform is built on a cloud-based Hyperledger Fabric, which allows each member bank to have a cloud-based peer node that interfaces with the SWIFT central node. The central node provides transactional consensus between the two banks conducting the transfer. Read the complete article here.

 

PaaS Partner Community

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Podcast: Blockchain: Beyond Bitcoin By: Bob Rhubart

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Blockchain originally gained attention thanks to its connection to Bitcoin. But blockchain has emerged from under the crypto-currency’s shadow to become a powerful trend in enterprise IT — and something that should be on every developer’s radar.  For this program we’ve assembled a panel of blockchain experts to discuss the technology’s impact, examine some use cases, and offer suggestions for developers who want to learn more in order to take advantage of the opportunities blockchain represents. Listen to the podcast here.  For more information please see the Blockchain partner resource kit here

PaaS Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle PaaS become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Jarvis Pizzeria: Fourth step in Implementing the Order Processing, Decision Model by Richard Olrichs & Marcel van de Glind & Marc Kuijpers

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In our previous blog we gave an overview of the various type of decisions that are available for a Decision Model. In this blog we show by means of an example that Decision Models can also be used for making complex decisions. We are going to make a decision model that determines the order of preparation of the pizzas in an order.
The order of preparation is determined by the baking time, the total preparation time of each pizza and the number of available ovens (1 pizza per oven). Let’s assume that we have an order for the following 9 pizzas:

  1. Small Margherita
  2. Large Margherita
  3. Small Pepperoni
  4. Medium Pepperoni
  5. Medium Pepperoni
  6. Large Pepperoni
  7. Small Quarttro Stagioni
  8. Medium Quarttro Stagioni
  9. Large Quarttro Stagioni

Expected outcome

The pizzas with the longest baking time are prepared first. When pizzas have the same baking time, the total preparation time is also taken into account to determine the order. As a result, to determine the sort order we first need to determine the baking time and total preparation time for each pizza.

Because not all pizzas can be prepared at the same time, pizzas that are not in the oven will have a waiting time. Once we have established the order, we can also determine the waiting time per pizza. We explain this with the help of the figure below. Read the complete article here.

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Jarvis Pizzeria: The various Decisions of a Decision Model by Richard Olrichs & Marcel van de Glind & Marc Kuijpers

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In one of our next posts we will implement the Decision Model in the Order Process. Before we do that we first explain the various type of decisions that are available for a Decision Model.
The Decision Model editor in PCS (Process Cloud Service) or the later OIC (Oracle Integration Cloud) supports the DMN (Decision Modeling Notation) standard version 1.1, and uses FEEL (Friendly Enough Expression Language) to make decision modeling easier and more intuitive.
In DMN all decision logic is represented as ‘boxed expressions’. A ‘boxed expression’ is a graphical notation for decision logic. Within OIC we recognize the following boxed expressions: Read the complete article here.

PaaS Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle PaaS become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Jarvis Pizzeria: Activating activities and attaining milestones by Richard Olrichs & Marcel van de Glind & Marc Kuijpers

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In our previous blogs we have given a brief overview of the look-and-feel of the dynamic process possibilities within PCS. In this blog we take a dive into the activation of activities, how milestones can be attained and how rules are configured to make sure that the correct actions are triggered when conditions are met.
Let’s take a look at our dynamic Jarvis overview first. In the picture below we came up with three stages: ordering, preparation and delivery.

Obviously we start the preparation phase after the ordering stage has completed. This configuration is shown below: Read the complete article here.

 

PaaS Partner Community

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Jarvis Pizzeria: The logic underneath the Dynamic Process by Richard Olrichs & Marcel van de Glind & Marc Kuijpers

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In our previous blog we have made the first set up of our dynamic process. We created several stages and had the first processes, human tasks and milestones in there. Now that we have the first draft of the dynamic process, it is time to actually call some processes and human tasks from our dynamic process.
In this blog we will explain how that is done. We already had imported the Preparation Process Application. But the delivery and payment are not part of this application. They are part of the overall Jarvis Pizzeria application. So before this blog, we also imported the Jarvis 1.0 application and the DeliveryDM to the new integration cloud.
When we click the edit pencil of the ‘Prepare Pizza’ step, on the right hand side, we get to see the properties of this step. Under the Process section, we select the ‘PizzaPreparationProcess’ and the ‘start’ as start event.

We repeat these steps for all the processes we want to call, for example to do the delivery we call the existing start event from the DeliveryProcess. Read the complete article here.

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Jarvis Pizzeria: Setting up the Dynamic Process by Richard Olrichs & Marcel van de Glind & Marc Kuijpers

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In this blog we will implement a first version of the preparation of an order using a dynamic process. We continue where blog one stopped. The imported order process is extended with an example dynamic process.

We open the DynamicOrderProcess, which should still contains the example. We will build this so that it contains the Pizza ordering process. However, when opening the Process, we can see that the example is no longer there. Apparently, the example is not saved, maybe because we did not make any changes to it? Let’s create the example again, and then change it immediately.
The first step we take to make it our own is to define the stages. Rename the ‘First Stage’ in ‘Ordering’. The ‘Second Stage’ in ‘Preparation’ and add another third stage ‘Delivery’.
For changing the name of a stage, select the pencil in the title bar to get to to properties.
In there change the name. Use the add icon just above the pencil to add the third stage.

Now let’s save our changes and see what happens to this modified ‘example’. We close the Dynamic process, and then open it again.
However, our changes have disappeared as well. The whole example is gone once again. How is that possible? Is something thoroughly wrong with the application or is an example application just an example, and can it not be saved? Anyway, it is good to realize the example application is there as an example and not like a QuickStart application.
So let’s restart again. Now we will not create an example, but just add the different stages.
After doing this, yet again, let’s put it to the test. We save our application, close it and reopen it. Yeah! Alright! Now the changes persists, so it does have something to do with the example mode. Read the complete article here.

 

PaaS Partner Community

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Is BPM Dead, Long Live Microservices? By Luis Weir

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With the massive uptake of Microservices Architecture -industry wide- and with it, the adoption of patterns such as Event Sourcing, CQRS and Saga as the means for Microservices to asynchronously communicate with each and effectively "choreograph" business processes, it might seem as if the days of process orchestration using BPM engines (e.g. Oracle Process Cloud now also part of Oracle Integration Cloud, Pega, Appian, etc) or BPEL (or BPEL-like) engines are over.

Although the use of choreography and associated patterns (such as the aforementioned) makes tons of sense in many use cases, I’ve come across a number of them where choreography can be impractical.

Some examples:

  • Data needs to be collected and aggregated from multiple services -e.g. check the Microservice.io Composition pattern. Note that this pattern doesn’t necessarily implies that an orchestration is required. Could be that data is collected and aggregated (not transformed) into a single response. But if data collected from multiple sources needs to also be transformed into a common response payload, then it feels pretty close to one of the typical use cases for orchestration.
  • The process is human-centric and can’t be fully automated. Basically at some point a human has to take an action in other for the process to complete (e.g. approval of a credit card application, or a credit check) -BPM/Orchestration tools tend to be quite good at this.
  • There is a need to have very clear visibility of the end to end business processes. In traditional BPM tools, this is fairly straight forward, with Choreography / Events, although possible to monitor individual events, a form of correlation would be required to build an end to end view on the status of a business process. Read the complete article here.

PaaS Partner Community

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Pre-built Virtual Machine for SOA Suite 12.2.1.3.0

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Please note that this appliance is for testing purposes only, as such it is unsupported and should not to be used in a production environment.

This VirtualBox appliance contains a fully-configured, ready-to-use SOA Suite 12.2.1.3.0 installation.

All you need is to install Oracle VM VirtualBox on your desktop/laptop and import the SOA Suite appliance and you are ready to try out SOA Suite 12.2.1.3.0 — no installation and configuration required! Get the virtual box here.

PaaS Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle PaaS become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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