Tips for Working with Stored Procedures in OSB 12c by Sonal Sharma

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During a recent engagement, I faced a few issues while creating a database adapter for a stored procedure in OSB 12.2.1.2. I wanted to share the detailed steps to create the database adapter, the issues I encountered and the resolution to those issues, in the hope that his may help other people, if they come across similar issues.

As SOA Suite 12c uses JDeveloper as the development environment for both SOA and OSB, it is worth noting that it is now possible to create the database adapter in the OSB project itself. The unified development environment provides a consistent approach for both SOA and OSB, unlike the previous approach, where we needed to import the JCA and corresponding files in Eclipse. Read the complete article here.

 

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Effective Use Cases for XQuery Library in OSB 12c by Sonal Sharma

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During my recent engagements, working with SOA Suite 12c, I have realized the strength of the XQuery library feature (introduced in OSB 12c) to simplify SOA 12c implementations by avoiding copying code in various places, and instead centralizing it. In this article we will discuss following:

  • Overview of XQuery library
  • Effective Use Cases for XQuery library
  • Working Example: "Storing customer specific business logic"
    • Without using XQuery lib
    • Using XQuery lib – detailed steps involved
  • Summary
Overview of XQuery library

Creating an XQuery library was a new feature introduced in SOA Suite 12c. This feature provides functionality to reuse XQuery functions and avoid repeatedly coding the same logic, as logic can now be centralized at one place. This is a very handy feature and can be used to strengthen and simplify solutions implemented on the SOA Suite platform. Read the complete article here.

 

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ICS On-Premise Monitor – Agent Ping by Greg Mally

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The Integration Cloud Service (ICS) Connectivity Agent is a feature of ICS that helps with the cloud to ground (on-premise) use case that is common to companies who are moving into cloud technologies. The agent provides an ICS subscriber the ability to create ICS integrations that interact with on-premise resources like legacy applications, databases, etc. without compromising the on-premise resource. In an attempt to make the agent as simple and secure as possible, it is located behind the firewall where the on-premise resource is located and communicates to the Oracle Public Cloud (OPC) via HTTP only. This allows the agent to use existing firewall configurations without added requirements on the “typical” organization network. However, some networks are more secure, complex, and/or stable than others and therefore are less “typical”. When these types of networks are encountered, it prevents the Connectivity Agent from successfully communicating from ground to cloud (or ICS communicating from cloud to ground). This blog focuses on a scenario where the network that the agent is installed on is flaky/unstable.

Although the Connectivity Agent has gone through a fair amount of maturity due to exposure to a wide range of network environments, there are those edge-case networks that can introduce communication challenges from ground to cloud. Sometimes these environments impact communication such that the agent thinks everything is working fine when in fact messaging has broken down between the on-premise network and OPC. What do you do when you know the agent is not receiving messages and the various ICS/agent logs do not indicate any problem? To make the scenario more complex, the communication breakdown does not follow any type of pattern (i.e., it is random). The key to finding the root cause is to narrow the window where the problem surfaces. Once the window is narrowed down, things like tcpdumps and/or tools like Wireshark can be leveraged. Read the complete article here.

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Decoding JWT using the API Platform Groovy Policy by Ricardo Ferreira

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Introduction

With the explosion of APIs; most of the today’s computing challenges are being driven by it and therefore, new standards had to emerge to make sure that APIs can be used securely, while allowing developers to avoid having to reinvent the wheel every time they implement aspects such as authorization. One good example is JWT (JSON Web Token) which allows API developers to implement authorization – but without requiring that the user credentials be shared across systems. Moreover, JWT can also be signed (by using JWS) and encrypted (by using JWE) which brings even more robustness to the table.

JWT is widely used in the context of OAuth 2.0, which defines a protocol for authorization. Implementing OAuth 2.0 results in an API granting authorization for a given request as long as the request carries a valid token. If the token is valid, the API considers the request authorized and processes it accordingly. This design is simple but very powerful because it eliminates the need to authenticate every single request and more importantly – it eliminates the need to carry the user credentials with the request.

As shown in figure 1, the token is originally obtained from an authorization server that client applications have access to. Once the token is obtained, it can be re-used over multiple API calls as long the token remains valid. Tokens often became invalid due to expiration. Most authorization servers are configured to define an expiration value on every token created. In this context; the API outsources authorization aspects to the authorization server, therefore becoming free of that responsibility. However, the API is still responsible for performing token verification. That can be either implemented directly in the API or, it can be delegated to a gateway layer responsible for exposing the API to the outside world. While nothing can stop a developer from hard coding the token verification in the API code, it is considered a best practice to delegate that task to a gateway layer such as APIPCS. The reason is simple: that way you can promote better agility while building APIs; since this repeatable and error prone coding will be eliminated. Moreover, the APIs will inherit greater robustness regarding token verification since the gateway implements this functionality very efficiently. Read the complete article here.

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Connect Everything Extend Your Reach free eBook

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Read this e-book now and learn how the Oracle Cloud Platform for innovation will give you the edge your apps need to make digital business work for you in today’s always-on expectations. Get the eBook here.

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Access OSB Resources using Java by Carsten Wiesbaum

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Every now and then you might want to store some configurations in simple configuration files and use them as OSB Resources in pipelines. In most cases OSB functionality is sufficient to fulfil your requirements. However sometimes you might not be able to get to your goal directly. Recently, I had to retrieve a list of all values in a specific domain column within a Domain Value Map (DVM). As DVMs are primarily used to map one domain value to one or multiple other domains, existing DVM functions do not provide the capability to retrieve all values from a domain column. Therefore, I developed a Java Callout to get the desired result. The solution is applicable to all OSB resource types. This blog post presents the basic concepts used to implement a solution.

OSB Resources Libs

Oracle Service Bus uses a standardized Java framework to access resources. Within this framework resources can be retrieved using specialised repositories. The corresponding JAR-Libraries can be found within the following folder:

<ORACLE_HOME>/osb/lib/modules/

All relevant libraries follow the naming schema oracle.servicebus.resources.<RESOURCE_TYPE>.jar. The figure below gives an overview of existing libraries. Basic functionality is provided by oracle.servicebus.resource.core.jar. For specific resource types, such as DVMs, XSLTs or XMLs, explicit additional Java libraries exist. Read the complete article here.

 

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Setup of PaaS Computes (SOACS/MFTCS/DBCS) over IP Network for VPN Connectivity by Shub Lahiri

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Executive Overview

PaaS customers, in the past, have been able to provision their instances only over the flat network of Oracle Public Cloud (OPC). However, at present, support for PaaS computes with IP networks has been released. As a result, customers now have a choice to provision PaaS instances, e.g. SOA Cloud Service (SOACS), MFT Cloud Service (MFTCS) or Database Cloud Service (DBCS), using IP networks.

This option clearly comes with 2 distinct advantages. Firstly, there is no need to configure GRE tunnels between PaaS compute and the VPN Gateway running in OPC. Secondly, the customers have the flexibility of defining their own network subnet and topology for their PaaS instances running within OPC.

Since this feature is recently released, this blog is an attempt to provide guidance with the basic setup and configuration of PaaS computes using IP networks.

Solution Approach

To demonstrate the use case, a 2-node SOACS cluster, with an Oracle Traffic Director (OTD) serving as the load balancer, is provisioned first with IP networks. The steps outlined here are conceptually the same for an MFTCS cluster as well. The cluster is then connected to an on-premises private network over VPN.

The overall solution architecture with the network topology and VPN connectivity is shown in Fig. 1 here.

Fig. 1 PaaS Computes over IP Network with VPN connectivity to on-premises network

Solution Architecture

Before provisioning of the SOACS cluster, it is necessary to create a DBCS instance for the SOA Infrastructure repository.

Therefore, in summary, 5 compute instances are provisioned in the identity domain within OPC, as listed below.:

  • Database Cloud Service (DBCS)
  • SOA Cloud Service – Node 1 (SOACS-1)
  • SOA Cloud Service – Node 2 (SOACS-2)
  • Load Balancer (OTD)
  • Corente Service Gateway (CSG) – VPN Gateway (Oracle Public Cloud) Read the complete article here.

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ICS SOAP Connection – Retrieve File Uploaded WSDL by Greg Mally

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When working with Oracle Integration Cloud Service (ICS) SOAP Connections, it is common to upload a WSDL file when configuring the Connection Properties:

The focus of this blog is how to retrieve/recover the WSDL in the event the original file is not available. This can be accomplished in several ways that include an on-line and/or off-line approach. Regardless of the approach, it is important to understand that when the WSDL file is uploaded it is added to the connection as an attachment.

On-Line WSDL Retrieval via REST AP

ICS provides a set of REST APIs for managing and monitoring integrations, adapters, connections, lookups, and packages (https://docs.oracle.com/en/cloud/paas/integration-cloud-service/rest-api.html). One of these APIs can be used to retrieve the attached WSDL for the SOAP connection and interestingly enough, it is called Retrieve an Attachment. There are quite a few ways to work with REST APIs that include tools like SoapUI, browser add-ons like Postman/RESTClient, or linux commands like cURL. For this blog, we will be using linux cURL (https://curl.haxx.se/).

The Retrieve an Attachment API requires three pieces of information to construct the URL for the REST call:
1.  ICS host name ([domain].integration.[region].oraclecloud.com … the first part of the ICS Console URL)
2.  ICS Connection ID:

3.  ICS Connection Property Name (targetWSDLURL). Read the complete article here.

 

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ICS File handling options and tips by Mani Krishnan

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Introduction

Oracle Integration Cloud Service (ICS) provides file handling capabilities through technology adapters and other application-specific adapters. This post focuses on the most commonly used file handling methods in ICS, using FTP, File and REST adapters and some techniques to tackle advanced file handling requirements. Information in this post is applicable to release 17.2.5 of ICS.

File handling in ICS

FTP adapter is widely used for transferring and process files. It provides ability to read, download, write and delete files at an FTP/SFTP location.  Size limits apply to files read via FTP, 2MB for “Read” operation and 10MB for “Download to ICS” operation. Files could be decrypted, unzipped upon Read and zipped, encrypted during Write operation. Refer to the guide about using FTP adapter for more information.

File adapter allows file polling, read and write operations on an on-premise location, using ICS connectivity agent.  The target and source directories are locally accessible from the server where ICS connectivity agent is deployed.  Refer to the guide about using File adapter for more information.

REST adapter allows receiving files as HTTP multipart attachments, and sending file as attachments, given that the target endpoint is capable of processing files sent as attachments. Incoming HTTP requests are limited to 10MB in size. In an upcoming release (currently 17.2.5) , REST adapter will be capable of receiving and sending files in raw form in HTTP body using content type “application/octet-stream”. This will allow uploading to and downloading files to content servers, such as Microsoft SharePoint.

Finally, StageFile action, allows reading, writing, listing, zipping and unzipping of files within ICS. It allows reading and processing files previously downloaded into ICS or created by StageFile write action.  Note that the files handled by StageFile are temporary in nature, accessible only during execution of an integration instance.

Base64 encoding and decoding

File content that’s binary, not readable or non-conforming (to XML schema, for example) need to be converted to base64-encoded string so that web services can handle them. Likewise, web services return such content as base64-encoded string that need to be converted to files. ICS FTP adapters allow this through a schema shown below. Read the complete article here.

 

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Integrate and Extend SaaS hands-on training June 25th & 26th 2018 in Dubai

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For SaaS partners we offer two days hands-on trainings to extend and integrate SaaS with Oracle PaaS:

Dubai, June 25th & 26th 2018

In case you can’t attend watch thee Partner Overview Webcast on-demand here and get the partner resource kit here.

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For regular information on business process management and integration become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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