DB Link integration or ESB based by Dalibor Blazevic

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Pros. and Cons.

As the state owned electric company of one East European country is undergoing transformation to conform to EU standards it has been transformed from one monolith organization to different smaller entities, each with his own task. Furthermore these entities have been further subdivided based on a region. Also the new players arrived on the market as the law has ben changed to accommodate that possibility. Now the different organizations that emerged from this dividing and subdividing have not been able to use a single monolith ERP and billing application to process and accommodate all possible use cases that the process of selling, producing, provisioning, and supplying electric current, requires. Different companies have been allowed to use their own IT systems to satisfy their business needs. IT systems have become heterogeneous. However because of the need for cooperation and data sharing between these organizations as both required by law and by business needs, numerous use cases requiring integration have emerged. Organizations are faced faced with dilemma whether to invest in ESB based integration solution or use, from his point of view, simpler and chipper solution. Point-to-Point Solution that is based on numerous database links between different heterogeneous databases.

Integration entities

Beside the needs to exchange data between two organizations doing business in different regions, most of the data exchange occurs between entities doing cooperative efforts from selling to provisioning of electric current to the end users. First of all the end user has open possibility to buy electric current from different sellers based on the different package offering provided by seller. On the other hand seller has the possibility to choose from which producer to buy electric current based on the current market prices for electric production and future trend analyses. That means that distribution channel from the producer to the end user does not have to be constant as producer, provisioning channel from producer to distributor and supplier, and in some cases also supplier himself might get changed during the duration of the contract period. Numerous use cases are needed to satisfy previously mentioned requirements and we are going to mention end explain some of them and present them in both use case UML diagrams and possible implementation outcomes.

Use cases

From the moment when the end-user signs contract with the supplier to the moment when the electric current in delivered to the end user there are several basic use cases.

Use case 1: Sending user data to supplier

As the seller of the electric current does not have to be business that is directly related with provisioning and distributing of the electric current, electric current supply can be part of the bigger packages that can include e.g. telephone plus Internet plus TV plus electric current in the same package. Read the complete article here.

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Using the For Each action in Service Bus 12c by Jan van Zoggel

 

clip_image002In Oracle Service Bus 12c you can use the For-Each action to iterate multiple elements in your message.
While developing a service with For-Each functionality in Service Bus 12c I discovered that there are some subtle changes in the naming of the properties since 10g + 11g.
It took me half an hour to find out what I did wrong, documentation was not really helpful so hopefully this will spare you the trouble 🙂

In 11g the configuration looks like (screenshot from the OSB 11g Development Cookbook):

In 12c the configuration would look more like this: Read the complete article here.

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Enterprise Service Bus article part of Industrial SOA series

Everyone seems to need to use an enterprise service bus (ESB) nowadays, but there is so much confusion about its actual benefit and the various concepts this term entails. This uncertainity is revealed in statements like, "Help! My boss says we need an ESB," or "Why do I need an ESB at all? Can’t I achieve the same thing with BPEL or BPMN?" or even "We can do everything ourselves in language X." This article is an attempt to answer some of the most important questions surrounding this term using concrete examples, so that the areas of application that can be deemed "correct" for ESBs can be clarified:

  • What exactly is the definition of an ESB? Is it a product or an architecture pattern?
  • What are some practical uses for an ESB?
  • Do I need an ESB to build an SOA platform?
  • Which requirements do I need to satisfy?
  • Which criteria can I use to select the ESB that is most suitable for my needs?

Defining the ESB
An accepted definition for this term has yet to be firmly established that is most likely caused by a lack of industry standards, whereas standards like BPEL and BPMN 2.0 exist for process engines and other components. The term “Enterprise Service Bus” was coined by Gartner in 2002, and further introduced by the analyst Roy Schulte to describe a category of software products that he observed were available on the market at that time. Ten years later, there is still very little agreement on what exactly an ESB is or what it should deliver. There are different definitions depending on the manufacturer or source. Among other things, an ESB is defined as:

"A style of integration architecture that allows communication via a common communication bus that consists of a variety of point-to-point connections between providers and users of services."

"An infrastructure that a company uses for integrating services in the application landscape."
Read the full article here.

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