Groovy Time! How to use XML dateTime and duration in BPM 12c by Jan Kettenis

 

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In this article I show some examples of handling XML dateTime and durations in Groovy in the context of a Oracle BPM 12c application. Working with dates and durations in Java has always been painful. Mainly because date and time is a complex thing, with different formats and time zones and all, but I sometimes wonder if it has not been made overly complex. Anyway. Working with XML dates is even more complex because the limited support by XPath functions. Too bad because in BPM applications that work with dates this has to be done very often, and as a result I very often see the need to create all kinds of custom XPath functions to mitigate that.
This issue of complexity is no different for Groovy scripting in Oracle BPM 12c. And let handling of dates be a typical use case for using Groovy scripting because of this limited support by XPath. Therefore, to get you started (and help myself some next time) I would like to share a couple of Groovy code snippets for working with XML dates and durations that may be useful. These example are based on working with the XML dateTime type, and do not handle with the complexity of time zones and different formats. In my practice this is 99% of the use cases that I see.
In my opinion you still should limit using Groovy to handle dates and to the minimum, and rather use custom XPath functions, or create a Java library which you can can import in Groovy. But when you have to, this just might come in handy.

Instantiate an XML Date

If you have an XML element of type dateTime, you use an XmlCalender object. An XmlCalender object with the current time can instantiated as shown below: Read the complete article here.

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Oracle and Adaptive Case Management: Part 2 by Jan Kettenis

 

clip_image001This posting is the second of a series about Oracle Adaptive Case Management. The first one can be found here. I discuss the different options to define an activity, and the setting you can use to configure when and how activities are started.
There are two ways to implement an activity in ACM. The first one is by creating a Human Task and then "promote" it (as it is called) to an activity. The other way is to create a business process and promote that as an activity. As far as I know there are also plans to use a BPEL process to implement an activity, but that option is not there yet.
When using a Human Task the limitations of it (obviously) are that of a human task, meaning that the means to do some to do some pre- or post-processing for the activity are very limited. There are only a few hooks for Java call outs and XPath expressions, but as processing of that happens on the Human Workflow Engine this won’t show up in Enterprise Manager, and error handling will be hard if not impossible. So, when you for example need to call a service before or after a human task (like sending a notification email) you better use a process. Read the complete article here.

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Oracle and Adaptive Case Management: Part 1 by Jan Kettenis

clip_image001In this blog posting I address four key concepts that are used in Oracle Adaptive Case Management, or ACM for short. This article is the first in a series on ACM.
Recently I was involved in an Oracle Adaptive Case Management (ACM) project. Although some people involved knew about case management in general, it turned out that not everyone immediately understood how case management works with Oracle ACM. As you may be one of them, I will walk you through some of the concepts, using a format that differs from what I have seen so far, and seemed to work well for my audience.
I will not discuss the more general concept of case management. There are sufficient other references that probably do a better job than I could (for example Case Management Model and Notation, or CMMN for short, as defined by the Object Management Group ). For this article I will restrict myself to explaining that, unlike a “normal” BPMN process, case management supports a much more flexible “flow” of a process, for example supporting paths (flows) that were not thought of before, activity types that were not identified before, as well as stakeholders that were not known yet during the initial design. The “A” of Adaptive in ACM refers to the fact that some of this behavior can be configured run-time (after the system is out of development). Read the complete article here.

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