Tapping into life – An Introduction to Stream Analytics by Jose Rodrigues

clip_image001Welcome to a new stream (no pun intended) on Red Mavericks articles. This time, we’ll be doing an introduction on Oracle’s new Stream Analytics.

We’ll be guiding you through this new, and very cool, product showing what it is and what it can do to leverage this largely untapped resource which is event stream analysis. In fact, streams are everywhere and are becoming more and more open and accessible. If you “wiretap” these, listen to them and understand the behavioral patterns , you can build extremely valuable applications that will help you deliver more to your customers.

It’s a whole new ball game. I hope you find this interesting.

What is Oracle Stream Analytics?

Oracle Stream Analytics (previously Oracle Stream Explorer) is, in fact, an application builder platform, focused on applications that process events coming from the most various systems, internal or external to the organization, thus enabling Business Insight information and deriving relevant data from these events.

It works using an Event Processing Engine to perform Fast Data Analysis over a large number of events that typically appear in a given timeframe.

It also provides a run-time platform that will allow you to run and manage the applications you built.

It’s not a new Oracle Event Processor. It uses OEP as the underlying Event Processing Engine (you can also use Apache Spark as a processing engine, if you prefer. More on this in other articles)

The real power in Oracle Stream Analytics is, curiously, in its UI. As an application builder, it went to great lengths to keep the UI really easy to use. The result is, in my view, very well achieved, with enough simplicity to allow that Business Users, provided they have a bit of technical knowledge, can actually build  applications on their own or with little help from the IT. Read the complete article here.

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For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Video – How to build a Process Cloud Service Application (Business Travel Requests) in 40 minutes – Final Part – Wrapping it Up! by Jose Rodrigues

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Welcome to Red Maverick’s sixth video, the third of the Business Travel Request Management Series. In this series we’ll guide you on how to build a complete, working BPM application using  Oracle’s Process Cloud Service. For this part, the focus is on doing the final configurations and connecting all the dots, making the application fully functional. This scenario and video was first prepared by me for Link Consulting‘s Process Cloud event, that was held in July 2015. Watch the video here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Video – How to build a Process Cloud Service Application (Business Travel Requests) in 40 minutes – Part III – Business Rules Setup by Jose Rodrigues

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Welcome to Red Maverick’s fifth video, the third of the Business Travel Request Management Series.

In this series we’ll guide you on how to build a complete, working BPM application using  Oracle’s Process Cloud Service.

For this part, the focus is on setting Business Rules using Oracle’s PCS, to fine tune the process flow path, depending on process data.

This scenario and video was first prepared by me for Link Consulting‘s Process Cloud event, that was held in July 2015. Watch the video here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Process Timers – Controlling the time in which your process executes by Jose Rodrigues

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Following up a series of questions around setting timers in the Oracle Community forums, I decided to write this article to try and guide their use and how these can be used to control process execution.

Let’s start!

The Use Case

We’ll begin by setting up the scenario in which we’ll have to control our process flow.

Imagine that you want to have a part of your process that executes immediately if the current time is between 08:00am and 04:00pm (16:00 hours for us Europeans), or wait until 08:00am if it’s outside that interval.

It’s frequent to have some kind of control in parts of the processes, for instance when you want to send SMS to your customers. You certainly don’t want to do it at 03:00am.

How will we make this?

We should use a Catch Timer event, of course, and XPATH’s DateTime functions to check the current time and to set the timer to way for next morning’s 08:00.

The Catch Timer event has several ways to be configured (triggered at specific dates and times, on a specific schedule – every day at 10:28:00 (repeatable), or in a time cycle – every 2 minutes), but we’ll focus on the one where we configure the timer to wait for a specific time and date. More on the others perhaps in another article.

We’ll illustrate the use of timers with an example process. You can, of course, adapt it to your needs.

Defining the execution conditions

So you start by defining a gateway that will split the execution between:

  • Immediate
  • Wait for 08:00am
    • This will have to be split into prior to midnight and after midnight. but for now, we’ll consider the scenario of only two options.

So, you set the expression on the conditional flow that will do the immediate execution, leaving the condition that must wait for 08:00 as the unconditional (default) branch.

The expression should be something like this: Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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Process Timers – Controlling the time in which your process executes by Jose Rodrigues

clip_image002

 

Following up a series of questions around setting timers in the Oracle Community forums, I decided to write this article to try and guide their use and how these can be used to control process execution.

Let’s start!

The Use Case

We’ll begin by setting up the scenario in which we’ll have to control our process flow.

Imagine that you want to have a part of your process that executes immediately if the current time is between 08:00am and 04:00pm (16:00 hours for us Europeans), or wait until 08:00am if it’s outside that interval.

It’s frequent to have some kind of control in parts of the processes, for instance when you want to send SMS to your customers. You certainly don’t want to do it at 03:00am.

How will we make this?

We should use a Catch Timer event, of course, and XPATH’s DateTime functions to check the current time and to set the timer to way for next morning’s 08:00.

The Catch Timer event has several ways to be configured (triggered at specific dates and times, on a specific schedule – every day at 10:28:00 (repeatable), or in a time cycle – every 2 minutes), but we’ll focus on the one where we configure the timer to wait for a specific time and date. More on the others perhaps in another article.

We’ll illustrate the use of timers with an example process. You can, of course, adapt it to your needs.

Defining the execution conditions

So you start by defining a gateway that will split the execution between:

  • Immediate
  • Wait for 08:00am
    • This will have to be split into prior to midnight and after midnight. but for now, we’ll consider the scenario of only two options.

So, you set the expression on the conditional flow that will do the immediate execution, leaving the condition that must wait for 08:00 as the unconditional (default) branch.

The expression should be something like this: Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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How to build a Process Cloud Service Application (Business Travel Expense) in 40 minutes – Part I – Designing your process by Jose Rodrigues

 

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Welcome to Red Maverick’s third video. In this one, we’ll guide you on how to build a complete, working BPM application using  Oracle’s Process Cloud Service. The first part is about designing your process from a functional/business point of view.

In the next parts, you’ll see how to setup a process start form, build advanced rules, conduct escalations and going up management chains. This scenario and video was first prepared by me for Link Consulting‘s Process Cloud event, that was held in July 2015. Watch the video here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

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