Oracle publishes official Chef and Puppet samples on github by Mark Nelson and Edwin Biemond

clip_image002

 

Oracle official sample Chef cookbooks and Puppet modules are now available on Oracle’s official GitHub page at https://github.com/oracle/chef-samples and https://github.com/oracle/puppet-samples for Java, WebLogic and Fusion Middleware.

Chef and Puppet are arguably the most popular provisioning frameworks and we would like to help you with your WebLogic and Fusion Middleware provisioning by publishing samples for Chef and Puppet.  The Chef and Puppet sample modules and cookbooks are almost the same and are using the same development frameworks.

We start this series of posts with an introduction what these cookbooks and modules can do and provide a simple quickstart how to create a WebLogic domain in Chef or Puppet on a Windows, Linux or Solaris host. In the following posts we will install FMW software, patch and extend a domain with FMW software.

These Chef cookbooks and Puppet modules allow you install WebLogic together with Fusion Middleware on any Linux, Solaris or Windows host. The cookbooks should work in Chef 11 & 12 and can be used with Chef server or with Chef Solo. The modules should work on Puppet 3 & 4 and it should not matter if you use Puppet Enterprise, an agent or just use puppet apply.

The first release on github will contain the following cookbooks and modules:

  • fmw_jdk, installs JDK 7 or 8 and optionally configures the urandom random number generator service for Linux distributions.
  • fmw_wls, installs WebLogic 11g or 12c and optionally create thes Oracle user and group on solaris and linux.
  • fmw_bsu, patches a WebLogic 11g middleware home.
  • fmw_opatch, patches WebLogic 12c or any Fusion Middleware 11g, 12c product.
  • fmw_inst, installs FMW 11g, 12c product including Oracle SOA Suite, Service Bus, MFT, OIM, ADF Runtime, and WebCenter.
  • fmw_rcu, creates a 11g, 12c Common or SOA Suite FMW repository on an Oracle Database.
  • fmw_domain, creates a domain in development mode, configures the node manager, start the admin server and extend the domain with ADF/JRF, Service Bus, SOA Suite and optionally with BAM and Enterprise Scheduler.

A couple of important notes about these cookbooks and modules:

  • They don’t download any (free or licensed) software from OTN, Oracle support or edelivery, this is the responsibility of the user/customer.
  • Oracle Support won’t support these cookbooks or modules but you can raise issues or send us pull requests on github.
  • Binaries should be locally accessible in a directory or a network share.
  • They will create a domain only in development mode.
  • They won’t do multi-node provisioning like pack/unpack of a domain on cluster nodes.
  • Passwords in Chef can be defined in databags and in Puppet you need to do it yourself in Hiera.
  • They have dependencies to each other and will automatically include or require the depended manifest or recipe.
  • The default recipe/manifest does not do anything, you have to use the specific recipes or manifests. In Puppet the default manifest will be used to set some module defaults.

Detailed overview

These cookbooks and modules contains recipes and manifests with resource/providers in Chef and type/providers for Puppet. The recipes and manifest are a quick way to get you started and these minimal recipes are just calling the matching resource/type providers. You can call these yourself in one of your own cookbooks. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki

Maven Repository – Index now available – more to come by Mark Nelson

 

clip_image002I am happy to announce that we now have an index available for the Oracle Maven Repository.  This is a standard Maven index, built with the Maven Core Indexer code (donated by Sonatype to Maven – thanks!) and is available at https://maven.oracle.com/.index/nexus-maven-repository-index.properties and https://maven.oracle.com/.index/nexus-maven-repository-index.gz.

The easiest way to view it is to use an IDE like NetBeans, as shown below:

We are actively working with Maven Repository Manager and IDE teams to make this work for you across a variety of common tools you may use. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki

Demonstration of SOA 12c Maven support by Mark Nelson

 

Mark Nelson’s video covers the Oracle Maven Syncronization Plug-in, the SOA 12.1.3 Maven Archetype, the Maven Import Wizard, Oracle SOA Maven Plug-in, and more. Watch the video here.

clip_image002

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki

Adding an ADF Human Task User Interface to our SOA Maven build by Mark Nelson

With the new Maven support in 12c, it is much simpler now to include our ADF projects in our SOA Application build. Continuing on from this earlier post, we will now add the ADF project.
You can do this by opening the Human Task (from the composite view) and clicking on Form and Auto-Generate Task Form.
Then in the popup Create Project dialog box, give the project a name, I used HTUI1, and click on OK. It will take a few minutes to generate the project. When it is done, do a Save All for good measure.
Now if you want to take a look, you will see that you have three POM files – one for the SOA Project (composite), one for the ADF project, and also your application level POM. If you open the application level POM (that’s the one under Application Resources/Build Files, you will see that is is a multi-modules project that lists the other two, as you can see in the image below. It also has some configuration to tell Maven where to find ojdeploy. In this release, we still need to run ojdeploy to build and package the ADF projects, so you do need to have JDeveloper available to your build server if you want to build ADF projects there. Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki

Running SCA Tests from Maven by Mark Nelson

In this post, let’s look at how we can run SCA test suites from Maven. To get started, we are going to need a test. Let’s set up our process to add two numbers. Go ahead and open the XML Schema for the inputs and outputs and change it to take two int’s as input and return a single int as output, as shown below:

Now update the assign activity’s copy rule in the BPEL process to add the two numbers together. The “from” part of the copy rule should look like this: Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki

BPM update adds Case Management Web Interface and REST APIs by Mark Nelson

Oracle has just released BPM 11.1.1.7 Bundle Patch 3 which adds the out of the box web interface for Advanced Case Management and REST APIs for working with BPM.

The patch is available from Oracle Support, it is patch number 18072286.

The Case Management interface looks a bit like this:
acm

And here is an example of using the REST API.  You can call the REST URL (GET) http://yourserver:port/bpm/services/rest/application.wadl to get details of the available services:
Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki

Manipulating Human Tasks (for testing) by Mark Nelson

A few months ago, while working on a BPM migration, I had the need to look at the status of human tasks, and to manipulate them – essentially to just have a single user take random actions on them at some interval, to help drive a set of processes that were being tested.

To do this, I wrote a little utility called httool.  It reuses some of the core domain classes from my custom worklist sample (with minimal changes to make it a remote client instead of a local one).

I have not got around to documenting it yet, but it is pretty simple and fairly self explanatory.  So I thought I would go ahead and share it with folks, in case anyone is interested in playing with it.

You can get the code from my ci-samples repository on java.net:

git clone git://java.net/ci4fmw~ci-samples

It is in the httool directory.

I do plan to get back to this “one day” and enhance it to be more intelligent – target particular task types, update the payload, follow a set of “rules” about what action to take – so that I can use it for more driving more interesting test scenarios.  If anyone is feeling generous with their time, and interested, please feel free to join the java.net project and hack away to your heart’s content.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki

A Roadmap for SOA Development and Delivery by Mark Nelson

This post is part of a series on SOA Development and Delivery.

In this post I will present a roadmap and a target state for SOA Development and Delivery.  This will serve as the basis for an extended open ‘proof of concept’ that we will work through together, over a series of posts, to implement and prove this approach.

Let’s talk first about our target state – the goal we want to achieve, then we will come back and look at the steps on the journey.

The Vision – Continuous Delivery

Continuous Delivery is a set of practices, supported by tools and automation, that is focused on answering the question: ‘How much risk is associated with deploying this new change into production?’

It involves automation of everything that needs to happen between a developer committing a change and the release of the software including that change into production, including:

  • building the software
  • testing the software, and
  • managing the configuration of the environments

The outcome that we want to achieve, is that we can automate all of our:

  • build
  • component-level test
  • environment provisioning (for development, test and production environments), and
  • acceptance test

Read the complete article here.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki Mix Forum

Getting to know Maven by Mark Nelson

I have a number of posts that talk about using Maven to automate builds for Fusion Middleware projects.  I know that there are some people who have not used Maven before, or maybe only a little.  So I wanted to post a few short videos that explain the basic concepts and give a real example.

Here is the first installment – Basic Maven – you might want to watch fullscreen.

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki Mix Forum

Instance Patching Demo for BPM 11.1.1.7 by Mark Nelson

BPM 11.1.1.7 has a new ‘instance patching and migration’ feature that allows you to apply changes to running instances of processes (without changing the revision of the process) and/or to migrate running instances between revisions of a process.

There is a short viewlet demonstration posted here, but there is unfortunately no sound.

 

SOA & BPM Partner Community

For regular information on Oracle SOA Suite become a member in the SOA & BPM Partner Community for registration please visit www.oracle.com/goto/emea/soa (OPN account required) If you need support with your account please contact the Oracle Partner Business Center.

Blog Twitter LinkedIn image[7][2][2][2] Facebook clip_image002[8][4][2][2][2] Wiki Mix Forum