Seamless source “migration” from SOA Suite 12.1.3 to 12.2.1 using WLST and XSLT by Maarten Smeets

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When you migrate sources from SOA Suite 12.1.3 to SOA Suite 12.2.1, the only change I’ve seen JDeveloper do to the (SCA and Service Bus) code is updating versions in the pom.xml files from 12.1.3 to 12.2.1 (and some changes to jws and jpr files). Service Bus 12.2.1 has some build difficulties when using Maven. See Oracle Support: “OSB 12.2.1 Maven plugin error, ‘Could not find artifact com.oracle.servicebus:sbar-project-common:pom’ (Doc ID 2100799.1)”. Oracle suggests updating the pom.xml of the project, changing the packaging type from sbar to jar and removing the reference to the parent project. This however will not help you because the created jar file does not have the structure required of Service Bus resources to be imported. To deploy Service Bus with Maven I’ve used the 12.1.3 plugin to create the sbar and a custom WLST file to do the actual deployment of this sbar to a 12.2.1 environment. A similar solution is described here.

Updates to the pom files can easily be automated as part of a build pipeline. This allows you to develop 12.1.3 code and automate the migration to 12.2.1. This can be useful if you want to avoid keeping separate 12.1.3 and 12.2.1 versions of your sources during a gradual migration. You can do bug fixes on the 12.1.3 sources and compile/deploy to production (usually production is the last environment to be upgraded) and use the same pipeline to compile and deploy the same sources (using altered pom files) to a 12.2.1 environment. Read the complete article here.

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ServiceCloud Rightnow Integration, XSLT Transformations! By Fabio Persico

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I’ve just roll out to a live environment, a SOA Integration project with Oracle Service Cloud Rightnow.

The customer needed to migrate from a in-house CRM to Oracle Service Cloud and with my company Infomentum we have helped them in taking this big step. Since that I have made lots of experience with OSC WebServices.

Here I just want to share the complex XSLT Transformation which we have implemented to communicate with the OSC WebServices, hopefully these can speed up any other SC integration projects.

There are 6 transformation in the ZIP package (we have implemented more):

XSLT Name

SC Object

Out of the box Object?

Operation Type

xsltContact2Update

CONTACT

Yes

UPDATE

xsltOrganisationToUpdate

ORGANIZATION

Yes

UPDATE

xsltProgrammeToUpdate

CO.PROGRAMME

No

UPDATE

xsltProgrammeTypeToUpdate

CO.PROGRAMMETYPE

No

UPDATE

xsltCourseToUpdate2

CO.COURSE

No

UPDATE

xsltSessionToUpdate

CO.SESSION

No

UPDATE

In the XSLTs you’ll find all the details about the TARGET columns (Oracle Service Cloud ones). Here are some important concepts I want to highlight:

  • SC Columns in the XSLT are sometimes out of the box column, in some other cases they are custom ones. In the XSLT the latter will be identified with the tag GenericFields. Read the complete article here.

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12c XSLT Editor – XSLT View Overview

 

clip_image002XSLT View is one of two graphical views provided by the new 12c XSLT Editor. 

(For a quick introduction to the graphical views in the 12c XSLT Editor see here.)

XSLT View provides the ability to edit any XSLT file graphically. It is intended for XSLT developers who have a general understanding of XSLT and have written XSLT source code in a text editor.

XSLT View is effectively a graphical source view. It has many advantages over editing XSLT source in a text editor.  Many of these are listed in the XSLT Editor Overview at the link above.  I think the best way to show these advantages is through specific examples.  In this post I will use an identity template to create a complex XSLT map.

For our example we will work with a PurchaseOrder to PurchaseOrder map.

Our goal for this map is to copy the source tree to the target tree, and while we are doing the copy, we want to copy the ShipTo CustomerName value into the BillTo Address, so that when we are done, the ShipTo and BillTo elements will both use the same CustomerName.

We could do this by explicitly mapping each node, however, we can also use an identity template to copy the source.  Identity templates are often used to copy an input document to the output document, but make some modification while the copy is being done. If the source input at runtime is small compared to the number of elements defined in the source schema, it can be significantly faster to copy the tree using an identity template, compared to creating explicit XSLT statements for every node in the schema. Read the complete article here.

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